SS9M: North West Territory Resources

Lesson 1: Before Canada – First Peoples 

NWT Lesson 1 Notes

Lesson 2: The Red River Colony

 Advising Robert Semple (Reading)

Advising Robert Semple (Worksheet)

NWT Lesson 2 Notes

Lesson 3: The Red River Resistance (Part 1) 

Historical Perspective – Creating Manitoba

NWT Lesson 3 Notes

Lesson 5: Canada Takes the North West (Part 1) 

NWT Lesson 5 Notes

Treaty No. 7 (Text)

Treaty Analysis Worksheet

Lesson 6: Canada Takes the North West (Part 2)

Cause and Consequence Diagram

Lesson 7: The North West Resistance

NWT Lesson 7 Notes

Chief Crowfoot Reading

Ethical Judgement Worksheet

EN9M: 28 Feb

Great work this morning, Grade 9s! You all came in and got focused and ready to work, which was awesome to see. A reminder that this activity (as well as the one on gender from a last week) is preparing you for the essay that we’ll be starting on next week.

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EN12M: 27 Feb

Students who left early today: For Thursday, please select a method of social control explained in ch 1-4 and explain how that contributes to or detracts from social stability. This should be a short paragraph-length response (5-6 sentences). 

Thanks to everyone for a good discussion around chapters 3-4 of Brave New World. You’ll want to keep these themes in mind because they are the foundation upon which the World State functions and will be the basis for our discussions going forward.

  • So far, social rules are largely enforced through peer pressure/shame (just like our real-life social rules). Think about how Fanny reacts when Lenina tells her that she’s only been sleeping with Henry Foster for the past four months. There is the vague threat that her boss will penalize her for “anti-social behaviour” but the immediate form of ensuring compliance is through peer pressure.
  • In Canada, we view diversity and individuality as a strength. We had a lot of good ideas about how difference can be a weakness. Keep those in mind as we move forward.
  • Remember that dystopian literature began during a very specific time period. The social situation of the time is definitely reflected in the literature. In this case, the caste system (Alphas, Betas, Gammas, Deltas, Epsilons) is created through biology and reinforced through conditioning. This caste system reflects long-held prejudices about individuals of lower socio-economic classes and “inferior” races that were still very relevant at the time of publication.

SS9M: 27 Feb

I have updated the test information based on our discussion today in class. Part A remains the same and Part B has been changed to a straight matching.

You all did a really great job of coming up with important people, places, and events. The photographs of the board are included below. I will not ask you anything that is not listed here.

Textbook references: You are responsible for knowing anything discussed in class AND the information contained in the following pages:

  • 130-162
  • 170-182
  • 191-197

 

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EN9M: 26 Feb

Today we wrapped up the plot of Romeo and Juliet.

We don’t hear a lot from Romeo in Act 4 but he gets a lot of time on stage in Act 5. His death speech is very powerful. The whole way through the play, the language is desperate but hopeful. Once Romeo believes Juliet to be dead, all hope is lost for him.

Think about how the language in Romeo’s death speech contrasts to Romeo’s speech in Act 2 and Juliet’s speech in Act 3. We’ll be talking more about this during Wednesday’s class.

 

EN12: 26 Feb

Thanks for a good first class on Monday. I know it was a bit of a slow class but things will pick up as we move into the text of the novel. Keep in mind the features of dystopian fiction and the context in which this genre was created. This will be a key part of our reading and analysis of this text.

Dystopian Lit Examples

  • Features:
    • Catastrophic event: There is a past event such as a war or natural disaster that has resulted in dramatic changes to society.
    • Societal control: Dystopian narratives are characterized by strict governmental control over society. The way in which control is exercised can be an explicit police-state (like 1984 or The Hunger Games) or it can be more subtle (The Giver).
    • Reduced standard of living: The middle and lower classes experience a far more limited standard of living than the reader expects. The populace may lack one or more of: material wealth, political representation, social mobility, freedom of expression and movement.
    • People outside the system: There is usually a group of people who are not under the control of the government. They may or may not be working to bring down the government but they serve as a contrast to the majority of the citizens.
    • Extrapolation of current conditions: Dystopian novels are set in the future. The conditions that make the novel’s setting so awful are an extrapolation of the social conditions when the novel was written. So for example, if someone was writing a dystopian novel today, they might envision a future world where people lose their vocal cords because they only ever text each other.
  • Context:
    • The dystopian genre was created during the 1920s and continued to develop through the 20th century. Some of the social forces that drove this type of writing include:
    • Class struggle: Prior to the 20th century, the world was run according to fairly rigid class structures. Even in Ancient Greece, which is viewed as the birthplace of democracy, you could only vote if you were a male citizen who owned a certain amount of property. This ensured that the rulers of the country, the top generals in the army, or the bosses of any company were always drawn from a certain social class. In the 20th century, this all began to fall away. All of a sudden, there was the possibility that babies born to the poorest of mothers could rise to the top of society. This led to a backlash from the “ruling classes” to try and maintain the status quo. They didn’t want poor people running things!
    • Industrial militarism: Prior to World War I, the primary effect of the Industrial Revolution was an increase in manufactured goods and standard of living. World War I took the increased efficiency of industry and applied it to mass slaughter. This fundamentally changed the way in which many people viewed industry and it only became worse after World War II.
    • Global consumerism: The technological advances from WWI and II made manufactured goods cheaper and more readily available across the globe. The advent of mass media (newspapers, radio, and movies; TV came later) created the business of advertising and driving people to be consumers.
    • The police state: WWI and II saw governments interning or deporting their citizens on a mass scale. Canada and the U.S. both interned their citizens of German ancestry during WWI and their citizens of Japanese ancestry during WWII. Of course, Germany detained their Jewish citizens during WWII with disastrous results. Again, technology played a role in allowing governments to surveil their citizens with greater efficiency.
    • The danger of science: In Social Studies, we usually view developments in science as a positive. During the first half of the 20th century, scientists discovered antibiotics and insulin, child mortality dropped, life expectancy grew, and they created airplanes, blimps, and spacecrafts. However, not everyone saw this as a net positive for society and worried about what scientists might discover next.

SS9M: 23 Feb

Slides from the lecture on the Northwest Resistance

The Northwest Resistance is the final event that we’ll be looking at as a part of this unit. Everything that we have studied up to this point is building to the events of the Northwest Resistance. The consequences of the defeat suffered by the Métis and First Peoples are still being felt today. So as you begin to review the content that we’ve discussed throughout the last three weeks, think carefully about the relationships between these events. Many are related; some are not.

Please come to Tuesday’s class with your homework complete and prepared to ask questions about the material ahead of the test.

SS9M: Unit Test

Here is the format for the unit test on Thursday 1 March. The test is out of a total of 25 marks and has two parts:

Part 1: Identification and Explanation

5 questions; 20 marks

I will provide you with a name, place, or event from our study of this unit. You must correctly identify and explain the significance of the name, place, or event. This is an opportunity to showcase your knowledge. You earn one mark for identification and three marks for explanation. I will provide you with 8 person/place/events and you must select 5 to identify and explain.

Example: Gabriel Dumont

Example Response: Gabriel Dumont was a leader of the Métis people during the Northwest Resistance of 1885. When large numbers of Métis left Manitoba after the Red River Resistance, Dumont was elected President of the Council of St. Laurent, which was responsible for regulating aspects of Métis life, including the bison hunt. When the Northwest Resistance began, Dumont became the military leader of the Métis forces. When the Métis and First Peoples were defeated by the Canadian militia on the battlefield, Dumont fled to the United States and never returned. 

Part 2:

8 questions; 8 marks

I will provide you with two columns. One of causes and one of events. You must match the cause to the appropriate event. For example:

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EN9M: 22 Feb

Good work on the reading quiz today! The scores were uniformly strong, which shows that everyone has been paying attention. We have another reading quiz on Monday and your plot timeline is due on Wednesday.

We watched the opening scene from Act 4. Following Romeo’s banishment from Verona, what is Juliet’s mental state? How can we evaluate the Friar’s behaviour and his plan? Remember, he is the adult here. Juliet is still a child.

We also looked at Juliet’s speech from Act 4, Scene 3, as she prepares to take the potion the Friar has given her. This is a big moment for Juliet as it is the first time in the play that she takes action. However, as you might expect, she’s scared…

  • Line 18: Juliet calls for her Nurse and then reconsiders. Why?
  • Line 23: She has a plan. Even if the potion doesn’t work, she will not marry Paris tomorrow.
  • Lines 24-29: Juliet asks herself if she can she trust the Friar? Can she? Who can she trust?
  • Lines 30-49: Juliet thinks about all the things that could possibly go wrong with this plan.
    • Line 33-35: She could suffocate in the sealed tomb
    • Line 39-43: She could be stuck in the tomb with all of the dead bodies
    • Line 45-48: There might be ghosts or spirits that will torment her.
    • Line 49-52: Or she might just be so frightened that she goes mad
  • Line 53-54: If that happens, Juliet will beat herself to death with the bones of her ancestors.
  • Line 55-57: Juliet thinks she sees Tybalt’s ghost.
  • Line 58: She takes the poison so that she passes out. She can’t cope with the stress anymore.

EN12M: 21 Feb

Hey EN12s!

Thanks for a good first class today. I know it was a short one but things will pick up as we move into the text of the novel. Keep in mind the features of dystopian fiction and the context in which this genre was created. This will be a key part of our reading and analysis of this text.

Dystopian Lit Examples

  • Features:
    • Catastrophic event: There is a past event such as a war or natural disaster that has resulted in dramatic changes to society.
    • Societal control: Dystopian narratives are characterized by strict governmental control over society. The way in which control is exercised can be an explicit police-state (like 1984 or The Hunger Games) or it can be more subtle (The Giver).
    • Reduced standard of living: The middle and lower classes experience a far more limited standard of living than the reader expects. The populace may lack one or more of: material wealth, political representation, social mobility, freedom of expression and movement.
    • People outside the system: There is usually a group of people who are not under the control of the government. They may or may not be working to bring down the government but they serve as a contrast to the majority of the citizens.
    • Extrapolation of current conditions: Dystopian novels are set in the future. The conditions that make the novel’s setting so awful are an extrapolation of the social conditions when the novel was written. So for example, if someone was writing a dystopian novel today, they might envision a future world where people lose their vocal cords because they only ever text each other.
  • Context:
    • The dystopian genre was created during the 1920s and continued to develop through the 20th century. Some of the social forces that drove this type of writing include:
    • Class struggle: Prior to the 20th century, the world was run according to fairly rigid class structures. Even in Ancient Greece, which is viewed as the birthplace of democracy, you could only vote if you were a male citizen who owned a certain amount of property. This ensured that the rulers of the country, the top generals in the army, or the bosses of any company were always drawn from a certain social class. In the 20th century, this all began to fall away. All of a sudden, there was the possibility that babies born to the poorest of mothers could rise to the top of society. This led to a backlash from the “ruling classes” to try and maintain the status quo. They didn’t want poor people running things!
    • Industrial militarism: Prior to World War I, the primary effect of the Industrial Revolution was an increase in manufactured goods and standard of living. World War I took the increased efficiency of industry and applied it to mass slaughter. This fundamentally changed the way in which many people viewed industry and it only became worse after World War II.
    • Global consumerism: The technological advances from WWI and II made manufactured goods cheaper and more readily available across the globe. The advent of mass media (newspapers, radio, and movies; TV came later) created the business of advertising and driving people to be consumers.
    • The police state: WWI and II saw governments interning or deporting their citizens on a mass scale. Canada and the U.S. both interned their citizens of German ancestry during WWI and their citizens of Japanese ancestry during WWII. Of course, Germany detained their Jewish citizens during WWII with disastrous results. Again, technology played a role in allowing governments to surveil their citizens with greater efficiency.
    • The danger of science: In Social Studies, we usually view developments in science as a positive. During the first half of the 20th century, scientists discovered antibiotics and insulin, child mortality dropped, life expectancy grew, and they created airplanes, blimps, and spacecrafts. However, not everyone saw this as a net positive for society and worried about what scientists might discover next.